Translate

Pages

Saturday, January 23, 2016

Scarf #4 Begun

The fourth and final piece on this dobby loom warp is in progress. The weft is a cinnamon brown, and the treadling is small points, creating a small zigzag effect.

This entire warp has been an experiment in determining how close the two warp colors can be to one another and to the various wefts. Most weavers working with interleaved warps choose differences in hue or in value; this warp has two warps close in both hue and value, and wefts also close to both warps in hue and value. It's been fun seeing how well the pattern shows in spite of this lack of differentiation.

The motor lifter has been complaining a lot lately (which results in a horrible shriek and a failure to open the next shed). So DH says as soon as this warp is off the loom, we need to do a thorough oil-n-lube to find out what parts are binding and causing so much friction that the motor lifter is unhappy. Can't work with an unhappy loom... Weaving is all about rhythm, and a consistent rhythm is difficult to achieve when you're dreading the next shriek and pause.

Usually "please?" works, and the shed opens on the next press of the treadle, but sometimes the weaver is required to press a button on the DH-built lifter control box, walk around to the right side of the loom, and physically reposition the dobby arm for proper action. Oh, well, I need the exercise. Besides, in its lifetime, this loom (and accompanying systems) have performed so well that it would be inappropriate for me to complain as loudly as the loom is doing :-)

3 comments:

Laura Fry said...

The more mechanical assistance, the more things there are to go 'wrong'. :(

Hope you can figure it out.

Cheers
Laura

Alice said...

It is a beautiful pattern. As for the loom, sometimes a swift kick...that's what I had to do to my coffee grinder, and it worked. Failing that, your husband's suggestion might be the best.

Connie Rose said...

I think the very close colors work brilliantly. I've always liked "monochromatic" work where the subtle color changes create a visual texture of their own.